Biography

I was born in Fredericton, New Brunswick, and in 2007 I completed my BA (honours) in political science at St. Thomas University. In 2009, I defended my MA in political science at the University of Calgary. My MA thesis, “From Commission to Conception: Commercial Surrogacy and Morality Policy in Canada,” examined the effect of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on legislation concerning assisted reproductive technologies.

In 2014, I completed my PhD at the University of Calgary. My dissertation was entitled “Failure to Reproduce: Assisted Reproductive Technology Policy in Canada.” It explored the history of provincial and federal regulation of assisted reproduction policy in Canada, focusing specifically on the role of courts and self-regulatory medical organizations in creating and sustaining public policy. From 2014-2015, I was a Killam Postdoctoral Fellow at Novel Tech Ethics in the Faculty of Medicine at Dalhousie University. My research at Dalhousie concerned embryonic research and the governance of fertility clinics in Canada.

Since July 2015, I have been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph. My current research project is a comparative analysis of assisted reproductive technology policy in Canada, Australia, and the United States.